Richard Moult: The Green Damask Room

 

If Myatt really was Anton Long – and we place stress on the word “if” – then we can do no better than quote what someone, a modern satanist, recently wrote:

{quote}
Satanism is not posting on a forum, nor is it opining in the mind. It is the path walked. What we do defines us, and the more time spent in the real world presencing the philosophy, leaves no time for arguing about it on-line.

All philosophical discussion around its essence simply serves as an avenue for the uninitiated (and ironically I mean that in the philosophical sense) to dip a toe in the water of complete self comprehension that comes with living it. […]

Boiled down to the essence of transgression, Satanism always was and is individual anarchism.
{/quote}

David Myatt’s documented antinomian – transgressive, sinister-numinous, and rather anarchic – life {1} seems to define him as either (i) ‘Anton Long’ (and thus as a practical example of the Seven Fold Way of the Order of Nine Angles), or (ii) as someone who having undertaken “a Siddhartha-like search for truth” {2} learned via pathei mathos and as a result developed his own philosophy, a philosophy evident in his post-2011 writings {3}.

Whichever way Myatt’s life is viewed – as an example of modern satanism or as an interesting example of someone gradually, over decades, learning from the vicissitudes of life – he is certainly an interesting person who perhaps deserves more credit than he has hitherto been accorded, especially by academics.

JB
2017 ev

{1} A reasonable and fairly unbiased overview of Myatt’s documented, rather strange, and diverse life is provided by the current Wikipedia page about him, a pdf version of which is here: https://wyrdsister.files.wordpress.com/2017/01/myatt-wikipedia.pdf

{2} Jeffrey Kaplan. Encyclopedia of White Power: A Sourcebook on the Radical Racist Right. Rowman & Littlefield, 2000. p. 216.

This quote about Myatt is also referenced in the book Terrorist’s Creed: Fanatical Violence and the Human Need for Meaning by Roger Griffin, published by Palgrave Macmillan in 2012.

{3} qv. Myatt’s own weblog at https://davidmyatt.wordpress.com/2014/10/07/writings-concerning-the-philosophy-of-pathei-mathos/


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