Introduction

The Order of Nine Angles Code of Kindred Honor sets certain standards for our own personal behaviour and how we relate to our own kind and to others. Our Code, being based on honour, thus concerns personal knowing, and therefore demands that we judge others solely on the basis of a personal knowing of them – on their deeds, on their behaviour toward us and toward those to whom we have given a personal pledge of loyalty.

We know our own kind by their deeds and their way of life; that is through a personal knowing.

The O9A Code of Kindred Honour

Those who are not our kindred brothers or sisters are mundanes. Those who are our brothers and sisters live by – and are prepared to die by – our unique code of honour.

Our Kindred-Honour means we are fiercely loyal to only our own ONA kind. Our Kindred-Honour means we are wary of, and do not trust – and often despise – all those who are not like us, especially mundanes.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to be ready, willing, and able to defend ourselves, in any situation, and to be prepared to use lethal force to so defend ourselves.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to be loyal to, and to defend, our own kind: to do our duty, even unto death, to those of our brothers and sisters to whom we have sworn a personal oath of loyalty.

Our obligation – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to seek revenge, if necessary unto death, against anyone who acts dishonourably toward us, or who acts dishonourably toward those to whom we have sworn a personal oath of loyalty.

Our obligation – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to never willingly submit to any mundane; to die fighting rather than surrender to them; to die rather (if necessary by our own hand) than allow ourselves to be dishonourably humiliated by them.

Our obligation – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to never trust any oath or any pledge of loyalty given, or any promise made, by any mundane, and to be wary and suspicious of them at all times.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to settle our serious disputes, among ourselves, by either trial by combat, or by a duel involving deadly weapons; and to challenge to a duel anyone – mundane, or one of our own kind – who impugns our kindred honour or who makes mundane accusations against us.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to settle our non-serious disputes, among ourselves, by having a man or woman from among us (a brother or sister who is highly esteemed because of their honourable deeds), arbitrate and decide the matter for us, and to accept without question, and to abide by, their decision, because of the respect we have accorded them as arbitrator

Our duty – as kindred individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to always keep our word to our own kind, once we have given our word on our kindred honour, for to break one’s word among our own kind is a cowardly, a mundane, act.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to act with kindred honour in all our dealings with our own kindred kind.

Our obligation – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – is to marry only those from our own kind, who thus, like us, live by our Code and are prepared to die to save their Kindred-Honour and that of their brothers and sisters.

Our duty – as individuals who live by the Code of Kindred-Honour – means that an oath of kindred loyalty or allegiance, once sworn by a man or woman of kindred honour (“I swear on my Kindred-Honour that I shall…”) can only be ended either: (1) by the man or woman of kindred honour formally asking the person to whom the oath was sworn to release them from that oath, and that person agreeing so to release them; or (2) by the death of the person to whom the oath was sworn. Anything else is unworthy of us, and the act of a mundane.

 


 

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